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Gillian Triggs hits back at ‘deeply misleading’ Malcolm Turnbull over 18C claims

Written By: admin - Dec• 12•18

n Human Rights Commission president Gillian Triggs has hit back at Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. Photo: Andrew MearesThe president of the Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs, has hit back after an extraordinary attack by Malcolm Turnbull, accusing the Prime Minister of not being briefed and misunderstanding how the organisation operates.
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Mr Turnbull on Monday called on the commission to urgently review the way it manages race hate cases after “bringing” a case against three students that was last week thrown out by a Federal Circuit Court judge for having no reasonable prospect of success.

“What the judge was saying to the Human Rights Commission is, ‘you’ve been wasting the court’s time. You’ve been wasting government money’,” Mr Turnbull told ABC radio.

He urged the organisation to reflect on whether it was acting in a way that was undermining public support for the commission and its promotion of human rights.

But Professor Triggs said the commission had no power to instigate court proceedings and revealed she had been urging the government to introduce a higher threshold before the commission was obliged to investigate hate speech complaints.

“The Prime Minister was deeply misleading in suggesting that we had brought the case. We never bring cases and we are purely passive in that sense. We don’t prosecute, we don’t pursue, we don’t instigate proceedings,” she told Fairfax Media.

“The judge did not make any comment on the Human Rights Commission and made no such extreme, provocative statement.”

The government is poised to announce a parliamentary inquiry into the operation of section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, which makes it unlawful to “offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate” someone because of their race or ethnicity.

Critics say the law places an excessive curb on free speech and argue the Federal Circuit Court’s decision in the QUT case and the commission’s handling of a complaint against News Corp cartoonist Bill Leak demonstrates the need for reform. The Leak matter is unresolved.

But Professor Triggs argued the campaign is being orchestrated by News Corp and politicians “who have deliberately misunderstood the law”.

“There is no doubt that they have deliberately undermined a process that proceeds quietly, with 20,000 matters, plus formals complaints, each year,” she said.

She predicted a massive backlash from those who opposed changing the law during Tony Abbott’s prime ministership.

“There will be a huge political response by the Jewish Board of Deputies, the Chinese community, the Vietnamese, the Muslim community. There are many, many groups who spoke up last time. Why you would expect that to have changed, I’m not sure.”

The executive director of the /Israel and Jewish Affairs Council, Dr Colin Rubenstein, has mounted a strong defence of 18C after the court decision, while accepting the conciliation process may “require further consideration and review”.

“Especially at a time when xenophobia in is rising, this legal provision continues to be essential in helping to maintain social cohesion while providing victims of racism with a just method for seeking redress where they have been the target of racial vilification,” Dr Rubenstein said.

Professor Triggs said while the Federal Circuit Court had adopted a high threshold in ruling on breaches of section 18C, the commission was required by law to investigate and attempt to conciliate all written complaints. It did this in 74 per cent of formal complaints, with only one or two per cent going to court.

“Our statute requires us to accept the matter, as distinct from the Federal Court, which has got a much higher threshold,” she said.

“Even if I know it would fail at the Federal Court, we are bound to accept the complaint in the hope of conciliating it. It’s a form of social justice. It costs the complainant nothing and it costs the respondent nothing, unless they choose to go to lawyers.”

Professor Triggs said the commission had urged the government for some years to change the legislation and introduce a higher threshold before the commission investigated complaints, without success.

She welcomed the prospect of an inquiry, saying the commission would make a submission supporting “a stronger 18C that gets the message out even more effectively that abuse on the grounds of race in the public arena is unacceptable”.

Professor Triggs also defended the commission’s handling of the QUT case, saying the complaint met the threshold when it was lodged. “We kept on with it because we had every belief in the university and the students and Ms (Cindy) Prior (the complainant) that they were acting in good faith and would conciliate.

“After twelve or thirteen months it became very clear that we could not conciliate and therefore we terminated it, which allowed the parties to go to court if they wanted to.”

Malcolm Turnbull’s half-hearted push for marriage equality

Written By: admin - Dec• 12•18

Cold feet? There has been no landmark speech setting out Malcolm Turnbull’s modern n vision. Photo: Alex Ellinghausen Same-sex marriage reform has been allowed to disintegrate.
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 In Aussie rules they call it “putting in the short steps”: a faux dash to the ball when a blood nose looms.

Malcolm Turnbull might have put in a few of these on his marriage equality plebiscite. Few doubt the member for Wentworth’s heart is in the right place, but how strongly is it beating?

The Prime Minister’s desultory path to the present is no secret. He opposed Tony Abbott’s plebiscite but then agreed to keep it as a condition of getting Abbott’s job. He then took that plan to an election, formed government, and has since pushed the legislation up to the Senate, where its demise is assured.

But why? For all the valid pre-election arguments against the plebiscite, there are stronger arguments for it now than he has advanced. One is that whichever way the question is decided, it requires the assent of heterosexual , either through MPs representing the broader community – i.e. Parliament – or directly via the plebiscite. So for all their divergent procedural characteristics, the qualitative moral differences claimed by the plebiscite’s trenchant opponents are exaggerated.

Then there’s the fact that despite the plebiscite having been a delaying tactic in 2015, the delay now is the insistence on a parliamentary vote – which could be years away. Justice delayed is justice denied.

There are other arguments too. But, curiously, Turnbull has put few forcefully and none systematically. Compare this with his advocacy of a lifetime visa ban on Manus and Nauru refugees. Announced only a week ago, he’s been pushing that divisive little wedge relentlessly in the days since.

A key element missing in favour of the plebiscite – and more importantly the legal discrimination it could quickly consign to history – has been the cogent, public case for reform.

Where is the Redfern Address setting out Turnbull’s modern n vision? The landmark speech outlining his case for the plebiscite; the more durable socio-political legitimacy it offers; the unfinished business of equality; and, crucially, the reassurance to those nervous about defeat (the great unspoken in this argument) that Turnbull will deliver. Instead, all most voters have heard is that the “yes” case would prevail as if it is not in doubt.

Even gathering crossbench numbers in the Senate is easier if the public is engaged. Yet this reform, like the shambolic republic debate in the late 1990s – at which Turnbull was also at the helm, incidentally – has been allowed to disintegrate, to sink under the weight of procedural mechanics, rather than soar on the uplifting promise of fairness and civic advancement.

No doubt the PM will argue that he held up his end, did what he could. But did he?

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Pauline Hanson supports move to refer One Nation senator Rod Culleton’s election to the High Court

Written By: admin - Dec• 12•18

Senator Pauline Hanson addresses the Senate on Monday. Photo: Andrew Meares Senator Rod Culleton speaks in the Senate on the issue of his eligibility to serve in the Senate. Photo: Andrew Meares
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Senator Hanson listens on as Senator Culleton speaks on the issue in the Senate. Photo: Andrew Meares

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has backed the referral of one of her senators to the High Court, saying her integrity and accountability to the n people offered her no other choice.

A visibly emotional Senator Hanson spoke slowly as she reaffirmed her personal support for West n senator Rod Culleton, but said her fight to return to the Parliament had been too long and too hard to not act.

Senator Culleton’s election to the Senate has been put in doubt over a conviction he held at the time of the July 2 poll. That conviction, over the theft of a $7.50 tow-truck key, has since been quashed. In his own impassioned speech to the Senate on Monday, Senator Culleton argued that meant the conviction had never existed.

His party leader wasn’t taking any chances.

“I have always stood for honesty, for integrity, for what is the truth, and the people deserve no less, especially from this chamber,” she said.

“It goes to the very heart of our democracy and now with this at hand, it is a question over Mr Culleton’s, Senator Culleton’s, eligibility to hold a seat in this place. I was of the opinion when he was nominated for Pauline Hanson’s One Nation as a Senate candidate that he stated that he was eligible to stand under the requirements of the constitution section 44.

“I took that to be his oath and it was signed and witnessed; his signature was witnessed by a JP.

“My fellow colleagues and I support Mr Culleton, Senator Culleton, but we have seen on too many occasions politicians in this place and the other place who have not been accountable to the n people, and I will not stand here and be of the same ilk.

“I believe that it should go to the High Court to make the ruling on this matter and I hope the findings are, and I would dearly love to see Senator Culleton here again as a One Nation senator.

“I believe that I have the support of my other senators and I know that Senator Culleton will not be too happy with what I have just said. But I think that my integrity and my honesty – and I have fought for 18 years to be on the floor of this Parliament as a representative of the people – and I cannot sit back and disregard what may have been a wrong judgment. But I will leave it up to the courts to make the final decision.”

Senator Hanson tabled the declaration Senator Culleton had signed at the time of his candidacy, which stated he was eligible to stand.

The referral was passed by the Senate several hours later.

Prior to Senator Hanson’s statement, Senator Culleton had called on the chamber to “right the wrongs [and] recognise that natural justice has not been served in the Court of Disputed Returns over these spurious charges, which were annulled. There was no conviction on the matter, thereby acknowledging that they never existed.”

He blamed the move on political machinations and the two-party system, despite his spot in the Senate, should the court rule his election to be invalid, probably falling to his brother-in-law, Peter Georgiou, who was next in line on the One Nation West n ticket.

“Parliamentary representatives who actually stand up and represent their constituents will always be under attack from within and from without,” he said.

“That is all too often the nature of the political climate in this country. The preference in the party arena is for the confirmative to just warm those seats with respect to those parties, with no tolerance for true representation of constituent interests. This is not a democracy and that is not in the interests of the true representation in this place for all ns.

“Certain parties believe they have a vested interest in the Senate seat; their actions and reactions today reflect that vested interest in securing this West n Senate seat for which I was elected to serve my constituents in Western n for the next three years.

“Whether or not a concise vote is allowed in this chamber on this issue, it is clear from the reaction of many senators towards me today that their consciences are already affecting their votes and their demeanour.

“In due course, what has been going on behind closed doors will thoroughly be disclosed – both the skulduggery and the acts of integrity and character, that mateship, that separates the n national ethos in a league of its own, refusing to allow such acts of bastardy, without a challenge or an indication of support or solidarity.”

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China v South Africa cricket series: Kepler Wessels takes aim at an Chinan side lacking quality and heart

Written By: admin - Aug• 14•19

Perth: Former South African captain Kepler Wessels has accused the n Test side of lacking heart and says if the national selectors “had any sense” they would axe Mitch Marsh.
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Wessels, who played 24 Tests for before returning to South Africa and captaining his native nation, took aim at the ns after they were crunched by 177 runs in the series opener in Perth.

“They lacked quality, passion and the fighting spirit associated with n teams of the past. Their batting line-up has a frail look about it,” he said.

“If David Warner or Steve Smith don’t score heavily, the Aussies are in trouble. They have a long tail with allrounder Mitchell March batting at six. As individuals, the n players are under huge pressure. They have lost four Test matches in a row.

“This means that captain Steve Smith, in particular, is under the pump. His captaincy in this Test match was unimpressive. He isn’t in the best form with the bat either, which compounds the problem for him personally and for the team as a whole.”

Smith, averaging 57.4 overall in Tests, has 281 runs at 35.12 in his past eight innings. He made a duck and 34 in Perth.

Proteas coach Russell Domingo said the win, achieved without injured skipper A.B. de Villiers and, for most of the match, spearhead Dale Steyn, had been the best of his three years in charge.

“In terms of my three years in the side, we’ve won in Sri Lanka in tough conditions, we’ve won in Dubai but this is, in my opinion, the four best days of Test cricket after day one that I’ve been a part of,” he said.

“To have only two bowlers, a debutant spinner, a middle order where a lot of questions were being asked of J.P. Duminy by the media and the public, though I never doubted him, there was a lot of pressure on the side.

“As far as I’m concerned, it’s the best four days of Test cricket that I’ve seen as the coach of the side. It’s up there (in the country’s greatest wins) – I can’t comment on the previous Test wins. In my tenure it’s the best I’ve seen.”

The ns have much to debate ahead of the second Test in Hobart, for there are batting and bowling issues. Joe Burns is likely to replace the injured Shaun Marsh but batsman Callum Ferguson has been drafted in as part of a 13-man squad. The selectors had initially picked a 12-man squad for the opening two Tests, but the team’s dismal performance in Perth prompted a backflip.

“If the n selectors had any sense they would pick six specialist batsmen and opt for four front-line bowlers. This will give their team a better balance under n conditions,” Wessels wrote in his Supersport column.

“It is not easy to come back from a 1-0 deficit in a three-match series against a good team. At least six of the n players are playing for their position in the next Test, which brings a pressure all of its own. This is far from ideal for the home side.

“I am sure Faf du Plessis and his team will take a ruthless approach and try and secure the series by winning in Hobart. Nothing can be taken for granted in professional sport but from what we saw during this first Test in Perth, there is every chance that the Proteas can make it three Test series wins in a row Down Under. That will be some achievement.”

Domingo said the Proteas took great joy from the depth they had shown in Perth, where emerging fast bowler Kagiso Rabada and batsman Temba Bavuma – who also completed one of the best run outs in history – played key roles in the win.

“We’ve won some games of late without some of the best players in the world. A.B. de Villiers hasn’t played a game in a couple of months,” he said.

“We’ve put in some good performances. They’re all wonderful players, they’ve been at the top of the game for a long period of time but we can’t focus on it.

“We have some good young players coming into the system, some good young players at home who in time can develop into those type of players.”

Writing songs was a religious experience for UK rockers Band of Skulls

Written By: admin - Aug• 14•19

ON TOUR: Band of Skulls are playing at The Cambridge on November 26. Tickets are on sale now. THERE is something very down-to-earth and refreshing about Band of Skulls –if drummer Matt Hayward is anything to go by, that is.
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Pleasant, quietly spoken and fond of a giggle, he is one of those rare rock stars thatlets his sticks rather than his ego do the talking. I’m not sure he would even feel comfortable being referred to as a rock star.

Band of Skulls are the quiet achievers of British rock and arguably the hardest workers. When Weekender spoketo Hayward the band had just returned from a “brilliant” five-week stint in the US and Canada and were “readying ourselves for the next instalment”.

When asked if Band of Skulls had consciously avoided “the hype” some bands tend to revel in, Hayward said it simply wasn’t their thing.

“The media machine can be used in certain ways that I don’t think we’ve ever really signed up to,” he explains.

“We’ve been a band for quite a long time, growing up in our home town of Southamptonas kids, and it’s been a very organicprocess. Put it this way – we’ve been playing music together longer than we haven’t been playing music together.

“And we’ve always based everything on the idea that we’re only as good as our last record. We love playing, we love writing. We’re not so much into the drama of it all.”

What matters to Band of Skulls, Hayward says, is makinggood records and playing good shows. They chose the old-fashioned path to success: hard touring.

Instead of signing a traditional record deal when they started out, they struck a deal with a company in LA whowere keen for the young trio to tour.

“Wewere kids and worked in pubs and played in bands. So when you’re offered the chance to play in America, you’re not going to turn that down. So our career started a little weirdly. A lot of British bands are lucky to get to the States and have to work the UK circuit for a long time to warrant going out there.

“We did it backwards. It has had its positives and negatives but we were in no position back then to say no.”

Haywards says Band of Skulls have been around long enough to be able to recognise the “smoke and mirrors in this business”.

“Yousee a lot of people getting screwed up because there is a false element to what they’re doing and it isn’t necessarily an honest representation of who they are as people and who they are as a band.

“We’ve always steered away from that side of things. We like to keep private and let our gigs and records do our talking.”

Their latest album, By Default, was recorded in a baptist church in Southampton and produced by Gil Norton, who has worked withthe likes of Pixies, Foo Fighters and Patti Smith. The Reverend wasn’t entirely sure what was going on in his church but other than making tea and biscuits generally left the band to it.

“We released our first record in 2009 and since then we’ve been pretty much non-stop touring and only stopping to make another record,” Hayward says.

“It’s been a pretty incredible journey but there came a time when we all decided to go back to our home town and set up there. Everybody took a bit of time to remember where we all startedand what it means. Stripping away everything and going back to the original lifestyle we led there.

“I’d been walking past that church my whole life. We were looking for somewhere new to write in that would be inspiring. A lot of rehearsal spaceshave a sterile kind of atmosphere and you’re in your room and next door is some big famous person and it’s a little unnerving [laughs].

“The last time we were in one The Specials were next door and everyone was a little self-conscious because ofthis amazing band next door. Welike to hide away and do things our own way.”

As for working with Norton, it was a surreal experience.

“When Gil got in touch and said he wanted to work with us it was kind of mind-blowing. The records that he has produced have been soundtracks to our lives. It was kind of like ‘How the hell has that happened?’. I’m a drummer and Gil has worked in the studio with Dave Grohl. No pressure or anything,” he says with a laugh.

“It’s quite daunting but Gil is a wonderful guy andmakes you feel at ease. He works you incredibly hard and we’re just honoured to be learning from him.”

Hayward admits he still gets “starstruck” by musicians in other bands.

“It never leaves you. I’m the worst for it, so I find it funny when people think of me that way. We’ve done tourswith Queens of the Stone Age, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Black Keys.

“You have to maintain a bit of professionalism and act normal even though that kid inside you is screaming.”

Catch Band of Skulls at The Cambridge on November 26.

Queensland Police find koala in woman’s bag

Written By: admin - Aug• 14•19

Police have found a baby koala in a woman’s bag after stopping her at Wishart on November 6. Photo: Queensland Police Service
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There are many firsts for police, but surely this traffic stop was more than the officers could bear.

Officers from the Upper Mt Gravatt Tactical Crime Squad stopped a woman at 8.55pm on Sunday night on Newnham Road, Wishart.

The 50-year-old East Brisbane woman was arrested on outstanding matters but before being taken to the watch house, she was asked if she had anything to declare.

The woman handed over a zipped green canvas bag, telling officers it contained a baby koala.

Police have found a baby koala in a woman’s bag after stopping her at Wishart on November 6. Photo: Queensland Police Service

Not quite believing the “tail”, officers cautiously un-zipped the bag and found a baby koala.

Police are looking into claims by the woman that she found the joey a night earlier on Kessels Road, Nathan, and was caring for it.

The RSPCA Ambulance was called and went to the Brisbane city watchhouse to collect the joey, which was protected under the Nature Conservation Act.

The koala – believed to be about six months old – seemed to be in good health, although a bit dehydrated.

The koala was a hit back at the station. Photo: Queensland Police Service

RSPCA Queensland spokesman Michael Beatty said the joey had been on fluids but was doing well and would soon be sent to a carer.

“He weighs 1.5 kilogramsand we’ve called him Alfred,” Mr Beatty said.

Mr Beatty urged anyone who found a koala to not attempt to handle it.

“Please call our animal emergency hotline on 1300 ANIMAL. Often the animal may have no obvious signs of injury but it can have internal injuries that need immediate attention,” he said.

Remembrance Day 2016 鈥?Hunter ceremonies and servicesPHOTOS

Written By: admin - Aug• 14•19

Remembrance Day 2016 鈥撀燞unter services聽| PHOTOS Acting Sergeant Mike Wood (centre) stands beside Glynn Fenton at the service. Picture: Phil Hearne
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Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Maitland Remembrance Day 2015. PHOTOS: Stuart Scott

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Remembrance Day ceremony at East Maitland War Memorial. Photo by Perry Duffin

Dale Goldie at the Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton

Zoe Grady read In Flanders Fields at the Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Zoe Grady and Darcy Balazic laid a wreath at the Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Zoe Grady and Darcy Balazic laid a wreath at the Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Remembrance Day service in Kearsley. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Cessnock’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Tony Sheehan.

Cessnock’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Tony Sheehan.

Cessnock RSL Sub-branch president Max Lewis and Cessnock Mayor Bob Pynsent at Cessnock’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Tony Sheehan.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Remembrance Day 2015 in Cessnock. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Paxton Public School’s 2015 Remembrance Day ceremony.

Paxton Public School’s 2015 Remembrance Day ceremony.

Paxton Public School’s 2015 Remembrance Day ceremony.

Kurri’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Roger Quarry.

Kurri’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Roger Quarry.

Kurri’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Roger Quarry.

Kurri’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Roger Quarry.

Kurri’s Remembrance Day 2015 service. Photo by Roger Quarry.

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

The Remembrance Day service in Civic Park. Picture: Phil Hearne

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. RSL Sub-Branch president Jim Walker opening proceedings. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Remembrance Day 2015 at Raymond Terrace. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Medowie RSL Sub-Branch vice president Bob Parish addressing the town’s Remembrance Day crowd. Picture: Facebook/Medowie RSL Sub-Branch.

LEST WE FORGET: The 335 Squadron n Air Force Cadets performed the Catafalque Party at Medowie RSL Sub-Branch’s Remembrance Day service. Picture: Facebook/Medowie RSL Sub-Branch

LEST WE FORGET: Nelson Bay Remembrance Day service.

LEST WE FORGET: Nelson Bay Remembrance Day service.

LEST WE FORGET: Nelson Bay Remembrance Day service.

LEST WE FORGET: Medowie RSL Sub-Branch’s Remembrance Day service. Picture: Facebook/Medowie RSL Sub-Branch.

LEST WE FORGET: Father Chris Yates, from St John’s Anglican Church in Raymond Terrace, speaking at Medowie RSL Sub-Branch’s Remembrance Day service. Picture: Facebook/Medowie RSL Sub-Branch.

LEST WE FORGET: Nelson Bay Remembrance Day service.

LEST WE FORGET: Nelson Bay Remembrance Day service.

Geoff Hartcher laying a wreath at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Liz Stuckings singing at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Jim Olsen from the Dungog RSL Sub-branch at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Dungog Public School students at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Part of the crowd at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Don Redman, Blue Lister, Geoff and Pat Harcher and Lorraine Gleeson at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

The catafalque party at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

The catafalque party from the William Town RAAF Base at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Jim Olsen, Liz Stuckings and Padre Gordon Crimp at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

March to the cenotaph at Dungog’s Remembrance Day Service

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton High School Rememberance Day Ceremony

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Singleton Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

Muswellbrook Remembrance Day 2015

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Nathan Waters, Dylan Perry set to tee off at NSW Open Championships

Written By: admin - Aug• 14•19

GREAT OPPORTUNITY: Three-time Muswellbrook Golf Club champion Nathan Waters will tee off in the NSW Open Championships on Thursday.
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TWO promising Upper Hunter golfers are hoping to make their respective marks at the NSW Open Championship this week.

Muswellbrook’s Nathan Waters and Aberdeen’s Dylan Perry will face the likes of Peter Lonard, Peter Senior, Craig Parry, Robert Allenby, European Tour player Jason Scrivener, Rhein Gibson (PGA Tour) and two-time world long drive champion Jamie Sadlowski at the Stonecutters Ridge Golf Club from Thursday.

Waters qualified for the four-day tournament on Monday, after winning the qualifying round at the Long Reef Golf Club with a score of -3.

Ironically, the three-time Muswellbrook Golf Club champion and Perry were members of the NSW State Junior team, along with Jake Higginbottom.

Now, after a short stint away from the area, the 23-year-old is back “home”, much to the delight of club president Robert Sprague.

“We are extremely proud of Nathan as he continues to develop his game and pursue his dreams of playing golf for a living,” he said.

“As our current club champion, I have witnessed his power game first hand and have no doubt he will fulfil his dreams.

“The NSW Open is the first step on a long journey ahead of him.

“On behalf of all the members of the Muswellbrook Golf Club, we wish him the best of luck.”

Sprague’s sentiments were echoed by head professional Jason Taylor.

“Nathan has the ability to go a long way in golf,” he said.

“Many young players don’t get this opportunity and it is a great stepping stone to a future in amateur or professional golf.

“I wish Nathan all the best in this tournament – and in the coming years.

“It is possible for him to qualify for the n Open in the following week at Royal Sydney.”

Waters also has his sights set on the n Amateur in Melbourne, NSW Amateur in Sydney and the Avondale Medal during January and February 2017.

TALENTED: Dylan Perry.

John Lewis: Sweet deal for Hungerford Hill

Written By: admin - Jul• 13•19

DEAL DONE: Vendor James Kirby (left) and buyer Sam Arnaout seal the Hungerford Hill purchase with a handshake outside the Broke Road, Pokolbin, winerySYDNEY hotelier Sam Arnaout, who last July bought the 48-hectare Sweetwater vineyard estate and its lavish Southern European-style mansion, is now buying the Hunter’s prestigious Hungerford Hill wine brand, 300-tonne crush capacity winery, vineyard, function rooms and leased restaurant.
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The sale was confirmed last week by Hungerford Hill vendor James Kirby, who said the new owner planned to retain all Hungerford Hill staff and to continue to champion the emerging Tumbarumba and Hilltops wine regions.

Sam Arnaout is managing director of Iris Capital, which owns a string of Sydney pubs, including the Clovelly Hotel, The Bourbon in Potts Point and The Grand at Bondi Junction, and is a major Sydney apartment developer.

No purchase price was disclosed, but Hungerford Hill had been up for sale through Jurd’sReal Estate Cessnock at a reported asking price of $6 million.For a price said to be near $12 million, Jurd’s sold Sam Arnaout the Sweetwater estate, in Sweetwater Road, Rothbury, on behalf of property developer Duncan Hardie, the originator of the Huntlee new town project.

The 16-hectare Sweetwater vineyard’s grapes have produced a string of trophy- and gold medal-winning shiraz reds for ace Hunter winemaker Andrew Thomas. The property also has plantings of cabernet sauvignon and semillon.

James Kirby said that contracts for the sale of Hungerford Hill had been signed, with settlement expected in early December 2016. Troy and Megan Rhoades-Brown would continue their lease of the two-hatted Muse Restaurant in thesite’s landmark building.

Sam Arnaout’s purchase of Hungerford Hill had reinforced his commitment to the Hunter Valley.

“I’m thrilled that the winery will continue as a family-owned business,” James said. “Sam shares my passion for fine wines and will continue to build on the fantastic achievements of all our team.”

Under the 14-year Kirby control, Hungerford Hill built a fine reputation for innovation – the latest beingThe Underground Projectbrand with five inaugural wines from Tumbarumba, McLaren Vale, Coonawarra and the Barossa and the 2015 Tumbarumba Pinot Noir is reviewed below.

The Hungerford Hill brand dates back to 1967 and was bought from Southcorp in 2002 by James Kirby, whose family were founders of the James N. Kirby refrigeration and engineering group. Having acquired the brand, the Kirbys gave it a home by buying what was then the One Broke Road property fromformer McDonald’s senior executive Tim Tighe.

The evolution of Holy Holy is Darwinism at its finest

Written By: admin - Jul• 13•19

POPULAR: Times have changed for Aussie band Holy Holy, who are coming to Newcastle next week.
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Just three years agoHoly Holy failed to fill even the smallest of Brisbane venues.

Last month, on the other hand,they returned from a sold-out tour of Europe and the UK and are now headlining a national tour.

Not a bad effort for a band whosefour members reside in three n states –Tasmania, Queensland and Victoria. Songs and ideas aresent back and forth and the band only meets up for a tour, rehearsal, sound-check or show.

Lead vocalist and guitarist Tim Carroll told Weekender it was “completely mind-blowing going to a town you hadnever heard of overseas and playing a sold-out show”.

“I remember in theearly days playing venues with 200 capacity and there weren’t enough people there to even fill the dance floor,” he says.

“But then again, perhaps that was the appropriate number of people because we weren’t really all that good then. Also, the bandwas somethingwe did on the side and the shows weren’t as regular. It was more of a hobby.”

Carroll, though,has been making music his entire adult life.

“I guess it’s part of my identity. I was a solo acoustic singer-songwriter for many years and I had friends who were producersand managers so it was all kind of familiar to me,” he says.

“I started writing music with OscarDawson in 2011 with no clear aim in mind. It was more like ‘Hey you’re a friend and I like your music so let’s write some songs’.”

Dawson, like Carroll, was not new to the music scene. The guitarist had toured with, and writtenfor, electro-rock outfit Dukes of Windsor. Also in Holy Holy is drummer Ryan Strathie, bassist Graham Ritchieand producer-turned-bandmate Matt Redlich on keys.

“Ryan was in Hungry Kids of Hungary and Graham played with Emma Louise and Airling and a bunch of other bands, so when we came together about three years ago we knew what we were doing and had a vision of what we wanted the project to be,” Carroll says.

First albumWhen The Storms Would Comedebuted at number 11 on the ARIA charts in 2015. Support slots for Boy and Bear, The Preatures and Vance Joy exposed Holy Holy to a new audience and sold-out tours followed.

“In Oscar I found the perfect writing partner. I had some strengths as a songwriter and withmy voice and my melody writing, but I didn’t study music at university and have had very little musical training so I’ve always been limited in the way that I could express my musical vision,” Carroll says.

“Oscar allows me to explore a much wider territory of sounds. He has great ideas and I really likehis style. And he’s not really a singer or a lyric writer and so we have this complementary skill set.”

Holy Holy’s second album is due to be released early next year and the first single, Darwinism, is out now. As for dealing with the hype and the media, Carroll is taking it in his stride.

“I quite like interviews. Often I find myself having a realisation about what the f ––– I’m up to because you tend to plod alongdoing what you do until someone asks you some good questions about why you do what you do,” he says with a laugh.

Catch Holy Holy at The Cambridge on November 17. For your chance to win tickets see page 27 of today’s Weekender.Darwinism – Holy HolyTim Carroll

Short Takes: Friday, November 11, 2016

Written By: admin - Jul• 13•19

TRUMP ascending. Told you so.
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Scott Hillard,New LambtonTO the n electorate: I hope you understand you cannot discount the anger and discontent people have for a two-party monopoly on elections after the US result. People were willing to throw a hand grenade into the White House. What would happen if people here decided to do the same?

Dylan Smith, WoodberryAS they say it could only happen in America. Donald Trump as president. What a joke. We all should be a little scared now. Seriously America, what are you thinking?

Colin Geatches, MayfieldWHEN Joe said the age of entitlement was over he meant for Mrs Clinton, obviously. Wouldn’t it be great to have an election and the outcome is no one elected a politician to lead us blindly as always? The big issue will be what to do with all the boat people that will seek asylum trying to escape the asylum that is the good old USA. Hillary-ous.

Steve Barnett, Fingal BayWELL the election circus is finally over in the US, for the next four years anyway. Now bring on the sideshows.

David Davies, Blackalls ParkOOPS. Somuch for the polls, eh? Obviously the silent majority didnot think Hillary was the right man for the job.

Ron Elphick,Buff PointWITH all the money being spent building the track for the V8 Supercars to use for four days a year, I was just wondering if the state government could spend some money getting rid of the Adamstown railway gates that stop traffic every day?Thanks in advance

Matt Ophir, AdamstownAS I see it the American people had Marge and Homer Simpson running for president and they opted for Homer.

Barry Reed, IslingtonTRUMP won, Clinton lost. Get over it.

Margaret Priest, WallsendFOLLOWING on from the hullabaloo of the American election, something comes to mind: the old saying that today’s newspapers are tomorrow’s fish and chips wrappings.A new broom sweeps clean.

Daphne Hughes,KahibahTHE POLLSDO you agree with the decision to extend Wayne Brown’s contract?

Yes 90%, No 10%DOES the NBN cause problems for your telephone services?

Yes 70%,No 30%WERE you surprised Donald Trump won the US election?

Yes 50%, No 50%MESSAGEBOARDBELMONT View Club will meet on Wednesday, November 16, from 10.30am atCentral Charlestown Leagues Club. New members and visitors are most welcome to attend. For more information, please phone: 4951 1524.

Short Takes: Thursday, November 10, 2016

Written By: admin - Jul• 13•19

I WISH to thank the young good Samaritan who offered to pay my fare home from Newcastle Wharf after 3am Saturday because the first ferry was not till 5.15am.I’m a pensioner, knocked by a reversing driver on Thursday before a funeral, spent Friday in St Vincent’s Emergency in Sydney and wound up back in Newcastle at 3am.While I couldn’t accept his offer, I didn’t thank this person enough. I would very much like him to contact me at [email protected]苏州夜总会招聘.au
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Terry Fitzgerald, StocktonCONGRATULATIONS must goto theNewcastle Herald’s editorial and pictorial staff over their uniqueAmerican election coverage in Wednesday’s edition (‘Pet snake ‘eats dog’, tries to kill owner’,Herald,9/11).The, perhaps unintended, front page cover story and accompanying photo stated it all.Between them they demonstrated a keen insight into the underlying United States’ psyche of the day.They also managed to announce a boldly commendable prediction, given thedecidedly contrary pollsleading up untilthe time.Keep up the good work.

StevenMicevski, DungogBEFORE the election, Republican supporters may have been singing I Believe In Miracles, whilst Democrats were thinking: “should we have gone withBernie Sanders?”.

Ron Piper, East MaitlandI WENT on a road trip the other day; and did not see a house along the way; no quick glimpse in a quaint front yard; with the white hot swans; once tyres on a car. On return; stopped but once; yes you save time; but the price we pay is more than freeways cost.

Dave Wilson, Bar BeachOH the irony. How ironic– and so revealing– that Mr Trump deemed the US election a stew if and only if he were to lose.God help America and the rest of us.RIP democracy as we knew it.

Suzanne Russell,Rivett ACTTHE POLLSARE you surprised at the perfluorinated chemical levels found?

Yes 11%,No 89%SHOULD NBN installers test medical alarms after the switch?

Yes 95%,No 5%WHO do you think will win the United States presidential election?

Hillary Clinton 68%,Donald Trump 32%IS a lack of aggression the Jets’ main issue?

Yes 30%, No 70%MESSAGEBOARDAS part of the Fair Share Festival, Transition Newcastle will show the documentary movie The True Costat Newcastle Museum this Thursday, November 10, from 7.30pm. The movie, which was filmed all over the world, examines the environmental and social impacts of cheap clothing. Brisbane-based fashion activist and blogger Jane Milburn will host a question and answer session on the topicafter the screening. Entry to the event is by donation. For details of the event and more information, please visit: facebook苏州夜总会招聘/events/452561034914369/

Short Takes: Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Written By: admin - Jul• 13•19

WHY is the garden at The Junction on Glebe Road so ugly? For decades it has been a beautiful feature of the area, now it is a weed garden of low maintenance shrubs and lavender. Lower my rates and I’ll do it for you.
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Mark Dultry, MerewetherHEY Donald Whatsyname:If all Americans were to cut the barrels off their guns, there would be enough pipe to run water around the world and then melt the rest down and make garden furniture and hand it out to the general population. People would be happy with that. Think man, think.

Ian Garry,AdamstownTHE failure of the plebiscite on gay marriage is probably fate taking its course.Considering the gains in legalities and human rightsthe gay and lesbian society have achieved, it’s probably only fair that the spiritual side has yet to be recognised and accepted.To only have this small hurdle of a word should be the furthermost thought by most. There will be activists who can never be pleased, but those who can remember persecution of the past will be thankful for what is and appreciate some resistance will always be present in a free thinking society.

Carl Stevenson, DoraCreekCOULD it happen one day when deliberately poisoned party drugs are sold to kill hundreds of revellers? Ithink it will.

Steve Barnett, Fingal BayIT is interesting to note that the Liberal Party does not have a consistent policy regarding light rail. Whilst the Mike Baird government is in favour of it, his counterparts in the recent ACT election argued strongly against it. I wonder what the Turnbull government position is.

Nigel Dale,AdamstownTHE comments from Mark Porter (Letters, 8/11) regarding RMS traffic advisory signs raise another serious problem, this time applicable to the M1. I notice nearly all the RMS gantries (cameras etc) on the M1 are now being flooded with inane advertisements. Some are animated thus presenting a threat to driver concentration. These structures must be used for nothing but RMS road safety messages and traffic advisories.

John O’Brien,MerewetherI SPOKE to a man recently who had been in Japan for a time. He said he stumbled across property for sale inNewcastle, New SouthWales, . Rail corridor land. Could this be true?

Darryl Horne,WaratahTHE POLLSCAN Sio replace Uate?

Yes 79.8%,No 20.2%IS an entertainment hub the right purpose for the old Victoria theatre?

Yes 97.5%,No 2.5%MESSAGEBOARDTHE From Central to Hunter Ex-students’ Association will enjoy a Christmas luncheon at Western Suburbs Leagues Club on Saturday, December 3 from 11.30am. Former staff members and ex-students are invited to attend our popular end of year function. Phone 4952 2705.